Thursday, February 26, 2015

Will Financial Aid Cover a Double Major?

Will Financial Aid Cover a Double Major?

Please help me out with question. I am majoring in finance. I am

thinking about pursuing a double-major in finance and real estate. I

will have to take only 6 more classes than what I am supposed to take for

my finance major. Will my financial aid cover the extra classes?

— Jeffrey P.


As noted in a previous Ask Kantro column,

What types of student aid are available for a second Bachelor's degree?,

the Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant

(FSEOG) and TEACH Grant are not available to students who have already

received a Bachelor's degree.


Students are considered to have earned a Bachelor's degree if they

have completed all of the requirements for the degree, even if they

have not yet received the diploma.


In certain limited circumstances, students who are completing a

State-required post-baccalaureate teacher certification program are

still treated as though they were undergraduate students for federal

student aid purposes. These students are eligible for the Pell Grant

and the TEACH grant but not the FSEOG grant, and their Stafford loan

eligibility is restricted to the undergraduate loan limits.



Colleges have some discretion in deciding when a student has completed

a Bachelor's degree program. Some colleges have more flexible policies

than others, so it is worthwhile to ask the college for a copy of its

written policies concerning Double Majors Do Double Duty







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Spring 2015 Must-Dos for High School Students

Spring 2015 Must-Dos for High School Students

You may have spent more time getting lost in hours of TV dramas and Facebook than appropriate, but spring is just around the corner. With that, it’s time to spring into action in your college and scholarship search.


Whether you’re a high school freshman or finishing up your high school career, there’s something you can be doing now to better your college and scholarship search.


High School Freshmen


Start thinking about courses you want to take next semester. While this year has been all about getting acclimated to the high school curriculum, this next year should be about pushing yourself academically. If you’ve never taken honors courses, sign up to take a few in your sophomore year. They will be great practice for AP courses, which you should start taking your junior year.


Also, get more involved. New opportunities to participate in extracurricular or volunteer activities inside and out of school will be cropping up more in the warmer months. This is your chance to explore interests outside of what you already do, which will look great on your resume when applying to colleges in a few years.


You’ll be taking the PSAT and/or the PLAN next semester as a sophomore. Look for any opportunities offered by your school or community to study and practice for these tests. They are the best preparation for the SAT and ACT, which you’ll need to take during your junior year.


Finally, start your scholarship search. It’s never too soon to start looking for scholarships, and you might as well start now when you’re not devoting time to your college search and applications as well.


High School Sophomores


Like high school freshmen, sophomores need to seriously consider their class schedule for next year. If you’re taking regular classes now, add a few honors courses to next year’s schedule. And if you’ve been taking honors courses this year, it’s time to step up your game and sign up for your school’s AP courses.


By now, you’ve taken the PSAT and PLAN at your school so it’s time to begin SAT and ACT test prep. Some high school counselors will advise you to take both tests and see which test yields better results. You can also look at your PSAT and PLAN scores, determine which you performed better on and then focus on that preliminary test’s equivalent.


High School Juniors


This year is crucial to your college and scholarship search. While you may have seen a limited number of scholarships available to you as a freshman or sophomore, the door of possibilities is wide open to you as a junior.


In terms of the college search, it can’t be stressed enough that you should start doing as much as possible to progress your college search this year. A lot of students wait until the start of their senior year to begin their search, and that’s quite a lot to pack on top of school, extracurriculars and the scholarship search.


This semester, take the SAT and/or the ACT. Chances are you’ll have to take the test a few times to get your scores up to where you want them, so start now.


Research schools online, through their individual websites and on college search sites like Fastweb. Get an idea of what you’re looking for and pick five to eight schools that interest you. Unless you have always known what type of school you want to attend, make sure your list of five to eight schools has variety. Look at big state schools as well as small, liberal arts colleges.


Once you have your list, schedule college visits in March, April and May. Your spring break would be an ideal time to go so you don’t have to miss any school, but weekends are prime time to visit college campuses as well. Just try to avoid graduation weekends in May. On your campus visits, take a tour, sit in on a class and meet with coaches or staff regarding your extracurricular interests.


High School Seniors


At this point, your applications are in and you’ve either already heard from some colleges about their admissions decision or your twiddling your thumbs waiting in anticipation for that first acceptance letter. Rather than inciting a near panic attack in anxiously waiting, put all of your nervous energy into your scholarship search and applications.


At this point, apply for anything and everything, even awards for small amounts. And remember, you can still apply for scholarships while in college – so don’t get discouraged if you apply for dozens of scholarships now and don’t receive any money.


While you may receive a few acceptance letters, you may also receive a few rejection or waitlist letters. Don't panic -- this happens to many students. Set your sights on what you should be doing now instead of why you didn't get in. Also, In March, you’ll be receiving your financial aid package. Look at where you did get accepted and start thinking realistically about which school fits best academically, socially and financially.


Your final decision is due on May 1 so take this time to make sure you’re going to make the right choice. Schedule last-minute campus visits to the schools you’re considering. Spend the night in the dorms, have lunch with a few current students and meet again with an admissions officer if you’re still not completely sold.


There are plenty of students who make their final decision but don’t really fall in love with a school until they’ve been there for a few months, and there is nothing wrong with that. So don’t worry if you’re not head over heels for your top choice. As long as you can really picture yourself on that campus, in those classes and making friends in those dorms, you’re on the right decision-making path.


Finally, take time to reflect on and enjoy your final moments as a high school student. College is such an incredible experience, but don’t let senior year lose its luster. Continue to work hard in class, savor those last few baseball or choir practices and make a point to spend time with your close friends.


Where are you in the college search? And what do you need to do to catch up this spring?


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Spring 2015 Must-Dos for High School Students

Spring 2015 Must-Dos for High School Students

You may have spent more time getting lost in hours of TV dramas and Facebook than appropriate, but spring is just around the corner. With that, it’s time to spring into action in your college and scholarship search.


Whether you’re a high school freshman or finishing up your high school career, there’s something you can be doing now to better your college and scholarship search.


High School Freshmen


Start thinking about courses you want to take next semester. While this year has been all about getting acclimated to the high school curriculum, this next year should be about pushing yourself academically. If you’ve never taken honors courses, sign up to take a few in your sophomore year. They will be great practice for AP courses, which you should start taking your junior year.


Also, get more involved. New opportunities to participate in extracurricular or volunteer activities inside and out of school will be cropping up more in the warmer months. This is your chance to explore interests outside of what you already do, which will look great on your resume when applying to colleges in a few years.


You’ll be taking the PSAT and/or the PLAN next semester as a sophomore. Look for any opportunities offered by your school or community to study and practice for these tests. They are the best preparation for the SAT and ACT, which you’ll need to take during your junior year.


Finally, start your scholarship search. It’s never too soon to start looking for scholarships, and you might as well start now when you’re not devoting time to your college search and applications as well.


High School Sophomores


Like high school freshmen, sophomores need to seriously consider their class schedule for next year. If you’re taking regular classes now, add a few honors courses to next year’s schedule. And if you’ve been taking honors courses this year, it’s time to step up your game and sign up for your school’s AP courses.


By now, you’ve taken the PSAT and PLAN at your school so it’s time to begin SAT and ACT test prep. Some high school counselors will advise you to take both tests and see which test yields better results. You can also look at your PSAT and PLAN scores, determine which you performed better on and then focus on that preliminary test’s equivalent.


High School Juniors


This year is crucial to your college and scholarship search. While you may have seen a limited number of scholarships available to you as a freshman or sophomore, the door of possibilities is wide open to you as a junior.


In terms of the college search, it can’t be stressed enough that you should start doing as much as possible to progress your college search this year. A lot of students wait until the start of their senior year to begin their search, and that’s quite a lot to pack on top of school, extracurriculars and the scholarship search.


This semester, take the SAT and/or the ACT. Chances are you’ll have to take the test a few times to get your scores up to where you want them, so start now.


Research schools online, through their individual websites and on college search sites like Fastweb. Get an idea of what you’re looking for and pick five to eight schools that interest you. Unless you have always known what type of school you want to attend, make sure your list of five to eight schools has variety. Look at big state schools as well as small, liberal arts colleges.


Once you have your list, schedule college visits in March, April and May. Your spring break would be an ideal time to go so you don’t have to miss any school, but weekends are prime time to visit college campuses as well. Just try to avoid graduation weekends in May. On your campus visits, take a tour, sit in on a class and meet with coaches or staff regarding your extracurricular interests.


High School Seniors


At this point, your applications are in and you’ve either already heard from some colleges about their admissions decision or your twiddling your thumbs waiting in anticipation for that first acceptance letter. Rather than inciting a near panic attack in anxiously waiting, put all of your nervous energy into your scholarship search and applications.


At this point, apply for anything and everything, even awards for small amounts. And remember, you can still apply for scholarships while in college – so don’t get discouraged if you apply for dozens of scholarships now and don’t receive any money.


While you may receive a few acceptance letters, you may also receive a few rejection or waitlist letters. Don't panic -- this happens to many students. Set your sights on what you should be doing now instead of why you didn't get in. Also, In March, you’ll be receiving your financial aid package. Look at where you did get accepted and start thinking realistically about which school fits best academically, socially and financially.


Your final decision is due on May 1 so take this time to make sure you’re going to make the right choice. Schedule last-minute campus visits to the schools you’re considering. Spend the night in the dorms, have lunch with a few current students and meet again with an admissions officer if you’re still not completely sold.


There are plenty of students who make their final decision but don’t really fall in love with a school until they’ve been there for a few months, and there is nothing wrong with that. So don’t worry if you’re not head over heels for your top choice. As long as you can really picture yourself on that campus, in those classes and making friends in those dorms, you’re on the right decision-making path.


Finally, take time to reflect on and enjoy your final moments as a high school student. College is such an incredible experience, but don’t let senior year lose its luster. Continue to work hard in class, savor those last few baseball or choir practices and make a point to spend time with your close friends.


Where are you in the college search? And what do you need to do to catch up this spring?


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Jobs Influencing Students Choice of Major

Jobs Influencing Students Choice of Major

Since the beginning of school students are told they can grow up to be whatever they wanted to be. While that is still the case, something is changing that is having students give what it is they want to ‘be’ a second thought. High school and college students today are choosing majors based not only on personality and passion but also on where the jobs are, and consequently where the money is.


According to the survey, “How Youth Plan to Fund College,” more and more students are having to pay for college themselves, out of their own pocket or with scholarships and loans. In an article that appeared on wausaudailyherald.com, Sheila Frederick, coordinator of the Career Center at Wausau East High School was quoted saying "You really can't look at spending all that money on a degree without knowing what the outcome is going to be."


With students being aware of the state of the current economy and more students being proactive about saving for and paying for college themselves, students today are considering investing in their futures over what it is they most want to study, however recent history shows this hasn’t always been the case. According to the National Center for Education Statistics in 2008 the fields with the highest number of degrees awarded are as follows:





• Business with 335,254



• Social sciences and history with 167,363



• Health Professionals and related clinical sciences with 111,478


With those three fields in mind, compare them to the numbers below which are considered the ten industries with the fastest growth of wage and salary employment from 2000-2010 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics:


1. Computer and data processing services (86%)



2. Residential care (64%)



3. Health Services (57%)



4. Cable and pay television services (51%)



5. Personnel supply services (49%)



6. Warehousing and storage (45%)



7. Water and sanitation (45%)



8. Miscellaneous business services (44%)



9. Miscellaneous equipment rental and leasing (42%) and Management and public relations (42%)


Note that the only category with a high number of recent graduates and an industry with growth is health services. Without the category of degrees awarded lining up with the category of growing industries - students can be left with backgrounds in fields that aren’t necessarily expanding or looking to hire.


Students who are unsure about their intended major or career path are advised to talk with their school’s career advising department and explore what options are available to them as far as education and employment.


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Start Your Summer Internship Search Now

Start Your Summer Internship Search Now

Believe it or not, summer internship application deadlines are already passing you by, and if you’re looking for an opportunity that is a little more competitive, you need to start your applications ASAP.


Here are four places to start your internship search right now:


Fastweb


Not to toot our own horn, but in addition to supplying you with scholarships that match your qualifications and interests, we provide you with internship matches too. Essentially, we take the “search” out of your internship search and deliver a plethora of summer internship options, meaning you never have to touch an Internet search engine.


These internships are targeted toward college and graduate students as well as graduates who may need an internship to bridge the gap between their past work experience and their first entry-level job. They cover quite a range of fields too, from career development programs with AT&T to a Newsroom Internship with MSNBC.


Applying is simple. Just click the internship you’re interested in on your internship matches page, read the description and click the link to the internship provider’s website if you wish to apply.


College Career Center


Didn’t even know your school had one? Here’s your chance to discover how much this facility can do for you. Typically, college career centers keep a database of internships that students at the school have previously worked.


From these past opportunities, the school works with employers to develop a further relationship, meaning future internships for students like you. Visit with a consultant at your college career center. They’ll gauge your interests, career aspirations and ideal location and help you find an opportunity that’s perfect for you.


Friends and Family


Ask your friends about internships they did this summer – do they have an opportunity they could recommend to you? Consider questioning your family members too. Chances are, they have internship opportunities at their place of business looking for hard-working, motivated interns like you next summer.


Additionally, friends and family that suggest internship opportunities to you may be able to provide a recommendation, which could go a long way in helping you stand out from the growing potential intern pool.


Local Companies


This last opportunity will take a bit of cold calling on your part. Identify local businesses and corporations in your hometown or college town that have career paths that might interest you, and call the human resources office about internship opportunities. Even if they don’t have a structured program, they may be able to customize an internship experience for you.


Calling at this point in the year shows that you’re not only interested in an internship but in their company as well. And flattery can go a long way in this game.


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What’s in Your Financial Aid Package?

What’s in Your Financial Aid Package?

Now that you have been admitted to college, it's time to weigh the financial aid package you will receive. The package should contain all federal and institutional aid that will go towards financing your education. Here are some of the more important parts of the financial aid package you should look for.


Federal Loans


All loans awarded to you will either be Stafford or Perkins loans. Remember that undergraduates have annual maximums and can only take out a certain amount of federal loans each year. Depending on your financial need, Stafford loans will either be subsidized (no interests accumulates while enrolled) or unsubsidized (interest accumulates). All Perkins loans are subsidized.


Pell Grants


If you demonstrate significant need, you will receive a federal Pell Grant in the amount of $5,830 for the 2015-2016 school year. If you continue to be eligible for Pell Grants, the amount will be increasing every year to keep pace of rising tuition costs.


Work-Study Programs


Eligible students can qualify for work study jobs on campus to help pay for tuition. In exchange for working a set amount of hours each week, the federal work-study program finances part of your school costs. In addition, you will also earn an hourly wage and gain valuable work experience.


Institutional Grants


Some schools offer admitted students additional grants that cover tuition as part of their aid packages. Most, if not all, of these schools are private and have ample financial aid dollars to spend. These grants never have to be paid back and are awarded based on the expected family contribution (EFC) calculated from filling out the FAFSA.


Merit Scholarships


Schools often award scholarships based on performance in school, athletics, or community activities. These scholarships often require meeting minimum requirements in GPA and test scores. Awards can range from a few thousand dollars to covering full tuition, room and board. Check the school's admissions website for information on available merit scholarships.


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Stars: They Intern, Just Like Us!

Stars: They Intern, Just Like Us!

Though these names may be recognizable in most households now, there was a time in which they were just students, looking for their start.


They had to start from the bottom to become the infamous celebrities they are today, paying their dues through hard work, dedication and, yes, interning.


Then again, there is the occasional already-celebrity intern, like Kanye West or Ashley Olsen, who were already famous and took on internships.


Either way, celebrities are really just like us, having to pay dues when necessary to pave the road to success.


You may be surprised to discover which top celebrities have held internships throughout their careers.


Oprah Winfrey









It’s difficult to remember a time before Oprah. Or, better stated, a time before Oprah Winfrey was Oprah. But, there was such a time (it's hard to think about) and that time was pre-internship.


Oprah’s internship with CBS affiliate WLAC-TV in Nashville was obviously just the beginning. Internships.com reports that from there, she was hired full-time as an anchor/reporter, making her the first African-American female news anchor.


From there, she soared to success in news programs, eventually landing her own national television spot, The Oprah Winfrey Show in 1986. (That’s her career summed up in the smallest of nutshells.)


Her story proves that internships (compiled with talent, of course) do lead to great things and, in Oprah’s case, achievements galore, billions and worldwide success.


Bill Gates









That’s right. He may have always been a genius but, before this genius became the Microsoft mogul, he held an internship position as a congressional page for the U.S. House of Representatives in 1972.


According to Internships.com, “congressional page” is a fancy title for a Capitol Hill intern. Two years later, Gates made history when he co-founded Microsoft.


Kanye West









When you’re a famous rapper wanting to break into the fashion industry or simply bored while taking a six-month music sabbatical because you dissed Taylor Swift at an internationally televised awards show - what do you do? Intern, of course.


It turns out that during his down town, Yeezy interned for Fendi.


Anderson Cooper









Before hosting shows on CNN, Anderson Cooper held a number of short-term jobs and internships, including one with the CIA.


According to Cooper, in an open letter written on CNN.com in 2006, “I know the CIA may sound more exotic and mysterious, but it was actually pretty bureaucratic and mundane, at least the little bit that I saw of it. By the end of the second summer, I realized it was not a place I wanted to work after college.


We’re glad he didn’t stay because it would have been a shame to waste those baby blues on the CIA.


Tom Hanks









He’s one of the great actors of our time and it’s hard to picture him as an average intern. But, Internships.com reports that, it’s actually an internship that inspired him to pursue a career in entertainment. While studying theater, Hanks met Vincent Dowling, head of the Great Lakes Theater Festival in Cleveland, Ohio, who offered him an internship.


Hanks loved the internship so much that he eventually dropped out of school and turned his internship into a three-year crash course experience, learning different areas of theater production.


He then went on to become Tom Hanks, the actor we know and love.


Betsey Johnson









Before she was a famous funky fashion designer, Betsey Johnson was a college student at the Pratt Institute. Her fashion career began with a post-college graduation internship at Mademoiselle magazine, which she landed after entering and winning the Mademoiselle Guest Editor Contest, according to Wikipedia.


Within the next year, she was part of the youthquake fashion movement and Andy Warhol’s underground scene, with non-other than Edie Sedgwick as the house model for her first boutique in 1969.

From there, her fashion career continued to rise and, in 2012, she celebrated 40 years in the fashion industry.


Steven Spielberg









Even as a teen, legendary director and producer, Steven Spielberg, was in pursuit of his entertainment dreams. The multiple Oscar winner got his foot in the door with a rather unusual “internship” arrangement, according to Internships.com.


As the story goes, a family friend who was an executive at Universal offered to give Spielberg some work around the set – the only caveat was that since the internship wasn’t official, Spielberg could not be granted access to the studio lot. Unwilling to give up such a great opportunity, the young Spielberg snuck onto the Universal Studios set to bypass the issue.


Post-internship, Spielberg continued to sneak into the Universal Studios’ lot and network. Apparently, it worked because now he is Steven Spielberg, renowned filmmaker.


Lauren Conrad









You may have witnessed her internship as it went down on MTV during “The Hills,” along with her entire high school experience on the “Laguna Beach” series.


MTV reality star, Lauren Conrad, interned with Teen Vogue while appearing on the “Laguna Beach” spin-off show, “The Hills,” and studying at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising.


John Krasinski









Well known for his role as Jim Halpert on NBC’s The Office, John Krasinski has also been in plenty of films, as well as taken on production, directorial and writing roles. But, according to Internships.com, it took a lot of hard work to get there.


After completing school, Krasinski relocated to New York City in pursuit of the silver screen. In 2000, he finally landed a script internship on Late Night with Conan O’Brien.


Seizing the invaluable opportunity, he used the connections he made on the show (and with NBC) as a springboard to launch his own career.


Ryan Seacrest









It wasn’t such a long time ago that television personality, host and producer, Ryan Seacrest wasn’t a household name. But, he’s been working long enough for it.


In fact, Wikipedia reports, he landed his internship at WSTR (FM) in Atlanta when he was only 16-years-old. The internship opportunity launched his broadcast career, as it’s where Seacrest received much of his on-air training in radio.


From there, he went on to study journalism at the University of Georgia and continued on local radio stations until he left college at age 19 to pursue his broadcasting career in Hollywood.


In 2002, Seacrest received his “big break” when he was thrust into the national spotlight as the co-host (now, sole host) of Fox’s then-new reality television series American Idol.


Ashley Olsen









If you grew up as a 90s kid, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen should sound as familiar as peanut butter and jelly. While studying at NYU, former Full House star interned for fashion designer Zac Posen.


The experience likely comes in handy while running the fashion labels, The Row, and, Elizabeth and James, with sister, Mary-Kate.


Aziz Ansari









Aziz Ansari is a name we hold synonymous with laughter but at one point, the actor and comedian was too shy to admit he was a comedian.


So, when he held an internship with the Onion it wasn’t in the writing department, as one would expect but, rather, Ansari held an advertising internship.


Ansari discussed his internship during an interview with AVClub.com, “I interned there when I was a sophomore at NYU, and I just interned at the advertising department. I just hung around and played foosball, pretty much. Everyone was really nice, and I still keep in touch with a few people. It was a fun internship, but it wasn’t like I was in the writer’s room or anything like that. I was just going around and delivering checks and stuff.”


We bet they regret letting him slip past their radar!


Tom Ford









Creative to the core, Tom Ford studied architecture at Parsons before making the switch to fashion after working a – get this - press internship at fashion label, Chloé, according to his Wikipedia page.


Though he refocused his studies on fashion, he ultimately graduated with a degree in architecture.


What’s a piece of paper when you’ve got talent like that?


Ford quickly went on climb the ranks of the fashion industry and become creative director for Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent (YSL), winning coveted fashion awards and bring the almost-bankrupt fashion houses back to unparalleled success. In 2004, Ford parted with the Gucci group and launched his own Tom Ford label.


He has also dabbled in film, launching his own film production company and made his directorial debut with the film, A Single Man in 2009, to rave reviews and award nods galore.


In an interview with Grazia, a UK magazine, Tom Ford discussed internships and hard work saying, “I think this is the problem today, people come out of school and think they should immediately be a star.”


He continued, “But I think everyone should be an intern - you should sweep floors, you should pick up pins. You should run errands because you learn so much.”


Well said, Mr. Ford. We could not agree more.


Sylvia Plath







Late-author Sylvia Plath held an internship at Mademoiselle magazine in 1953. Plath spent a summer living in New York City while working in the magazine’s Manhattan offices.


Though fictionalized, her famous novel, The Bell Jar was inspired by her experiences during her magazine internship.


Alec Baldwin









The “30 Rock” star has often been rumored to have thought about a run for political office and now we know why: he has roots on the hill.


Baldwin took on a congressional internship with the late congressman Rep. Jerome Ambro in the ‘70s as a college student at George Washington University.


Seth Meyers









The Late Night with Seth Meyers host and former Saturday Night Live Star got his start with none other than a Comedy Central internship – but Meyers didn’t get such a great employee review.


According to, US Weekly, Meyers discussed the experience saying, I had an internship once at Comedy Central in college and they said I worked really hard for five weeks and then I spent the rest of it watching Kids in the Hall," he explained. "They weren't wrong."


We’re glad he got his act together.


Sean Combs









While majoring in business administration at Howard University, Combs reportedly met fellow rapper Heavy D, who made some introductions on Combs’ behalf.


Apparently, the networking paid off and secured Combs his internship at New York's Uptown Records, which he dropped out of college to pursue.


This led to a talent director position and Combs quickly climbed the ladder finally leaving the company in the early 1990s as a vice president. He went on to start his own production company and solo career.


Conan O’Brien









The late night host and funnyman worked as a congressional intern for both Rep. Robert Drinan and Rep. Barney Frank in the House of Representatives.


O’Brien discussed his internship experience and short-lived career in politics during an ”Inside the Actor’s Studio” episode explaining that he didn’t pursue politics because, “I didn’t want to work my way up.”


Lena Dunham









Lena Dunham interned at independent publisher, Soft Skull, according to the Los Angeles Times.


According to their interview with Richard Nash, the independent publisher Dunham interned for, “she[Dunham] was great as expected.”


"You always want to feel like your interns are going to go on and do great things," Nash said. "I don't think Soft Skull can take the slightest credit for Lena's success, but it's always fun when interns become writers and publishers and things like that."


Steve Jobs









While in high school, Steve Jobs was offered an internship with Hewlett-Packard after brazenly calling president and co-founder William Hewlett to “ask for parts for a high school project.”


Impressed by the student’s gumption, Hewlett not only offered Jobs the parts for the project, but also a Hewlett-Packard internship.


According to Entrepreneur.com, it was at that summer internship where Jobs met and became friends with an engineer by the name of Steve Wozniak.


The two ended up founding a company called Apple Inc., maybe you’ve heard of it?






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Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Answers to Introductory Questions about Financial Aid for College

Answers to Introductory Questions about Financial Aid for College

I am a high school junior and an Upward Bound scholar. I do not

have any way to pay for college and I really want to attend. How do I

apply for financial aid? What are the requirements? Do I have to pay

for anything? What advice do you have for me if I do receive

financial aid?

— Alexis M.


Financial aid for college may seem complicated, with an entire

language of cryptic acronyms like FAFSA, SAR and EFC, but there are only a

few simple steps you need to take to apply for financial aid.


There are two main types of financial aid, merit-based aid and

need-based aid. Scholarships and merit-based aid are awarded based on

academic, athletic or artistic talent, or other criteria of interest

to the scholarship sponsor. Need-based aid is based on financial need,

the difference between college costs and your ability to pay.


To find merit-based aid, register for free at Fastweb.com to search

for scholarships that match your background. There are scholarships

available for students at all grade levels, including grades K-12 and

current college students, so the sooner you start searching for

scholarships, the more you will find. When completing your personal background profile on Fastweb, take the

time to review all of the choices in the optional questions. Students

who answer the optional questions match twice as many scholarships, on

average, as students who answer just the required questions. The

Fastweb scholarship matching service is updated daily, and you will

receive email notification when there is a new scholarship that

matches your personal background profile. The Fastweb and FinAid sites

are free.


To apply for need-based aid, submit the Free Application for Federal

Student Aid, also known as the FAFSA, as soon as possible after

January 1 of your senior year in high school. This form is used to

apply for student financial aid from the federal and state government

as well as for financial aid from most public and private colleges and

universities. The FAFSA is submitted annually. (A Renewal FAFSA will

be submitted during your freshman, sophomore and junior years in

college.)


If you have questions about completing the FAFSA, there are several

sources of free help. The US Department of Education's Federal Student

Aid Information Center operates a toll-free hotline at 1-800-4-FED-AID

(1-800-433-3243). You can ask your high school guidance counselor or

the financial aid administrator at a local college for help. Several

states operate a free program called College Goal Sunday that provides

hands-on help with the FAFSA on weekends in January and

February. Visit http://ift.tt/14RGX1T

to see if and when it is offered in your state.

There is also information and advice in the FAFSA section of FinAid

and in the FAFSA articles on Fastweb.


These days almost everybody submits the FAFSA online, at

www.fafsa.ed.gov. If you do not

have a computer, ask your high school or local public library if

there's a computer you can use. Otherwise, call 1-800-4-FED-AID and

they can send you a printed version of the form. The online form is

better, since it is a "smart" adaptive form that will skip unnecessary

questions and detect the most common errors.


Your college may also have its own supplemental form. About 250 mostly

private colleges use a form known as the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE

form. This form is similar to the FAFSA, but typically asks more

detailed questions. You can find this form online at profileonline.collegeboard.com.

(Note that there is no "www" as part of this web site's address.)


You will receive a "financial aid award letter" from the colleges

after you've submitted the FAFSA and other financial aid forms. This

letter will summarize the types and amounts of financial aid you will

receive. The financial aid will include gift aid that does not need to

be repaid, such as grants like the Pell Grant. It will also include

self-help aid, such as loans and work-study.


The prospect of taking on debt to pay for college can be frightening,

especially if you will be borrowing more money than your parents earn

in a year. You should try to minimize your debt, because every dollar

you spend using student loan money will cost you about two dollars by

the time you've paid off the debt. One of the best ways of minimizing

debt is to enroll at a less expensive college, such as an in-state

public college. But so long as you don't borrow excessively and you

major in a field of study with good job prospects, you should be able

to repay the debt after graduation.


There are also a handful of financial aid programs that are available

to you when you file a federal income tax return. These include the

Hope Scholarship Tax Credit, the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit and the

Tuition and Fees Deduction. You should file a federal income tax

return to obtain these education tax benefits even if you are not

required to file a return. The Hope Scholarship, for example, is

partially refundable, so you can benefit even if you have no tax

liability.


After you get your financial aid package, review the requirements for

keeping each source of funding. In most cases you will have to get

good grades or you might lose the money. Some scholarships are

renewable and may require a renewal application, academic transcripts

or other requirements for you to keep the scholarship in subsequent

years.


Finally, beware of scholarship scams and other financial aid scams. If

you have to pay money to get money, it's probably a scam. Never invest

more than a postage stamp to get information about scholarships or to

apply for a scholarship.


Can I start applying for financial aid when I am a 10th grader in

high school?

— Cierra B.


You will have to wait until January 1 of your senior year in high

school to submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid

(FAFSA). However, you can and should start searching for scholarships

immediately, as there are many scholarships available to students in

grades 9, 10 and 11, not just grade 12. These scholarships can be

found in the Fastweb scholarships database.


If you are under age 13, you won't be able to search the online

scholarship databases because of the Children's Online Privacy

Protection Act (COPPA). However, a list of scholarships for children

under age 13 can be found on FinAid at www.finaid.org/age13.


You should also save as much as you can for your college education,

because every dollar you save is a dollar less you will need to

borrow. Encourage your parents to save for your college education in a

section 529 college savings plan. These are tax-advantaged ways of

saving for college, similar in concept to a Roth IRA and other

retirement plans. Every state offers one, and you can save in any

state's 529 plan. More than 30 states offer a state income tax

deduction for contributions to the state's 529 plan. It is best to use

the direct-sold version of the state's 529 plan, as the fees are lower

than in an advisor-sold plan. Choose the age-based asset allocation

within the state plan to minimize the risk of stock market

losses. This shifts the funds to a more conservative mix of

investments as college approaches, reducing the risk of loss to principal.


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15 Financial Aid Questions You Need to Ask

15 Financial Aid Questions You Need to Ask

1. What types of financial aid do you offer? What are the requirements for need-based aid and for merit-based aid?


2. How much debt do students have when they graduate? What percentage of students graduate with debt?


3. If I get a work-study job, how many hours will I be required to work per week? Are part-time jobs available to students who don't qualify for a work-study job?


4. Do you offer a tuition payment plan that lets me pay the college bills in monthly installments over the academic year? If so, what fees do you charge for this service?


5. Does your college practice need-blind admissions? Or will applying for financial aid hurt my chances of being admitted? Do you consider financial need when deciding whether to accept students off of the waiting list?


6. If I don't apply for financial aid this year, will that affect my eligibility for financial aid in subsequent years?


7. Does your college meet my full demonstrated financial need, or do you practice "gapping"? Will you meet my full financial need for all four years of college?


8. Do you practice front-loading of grants? Or can I expect to receive a similar financial aid package all four years, assuming my financial circumstances do not change by much?


9. If I win a scholarship, do you reduce my financial aid package? If so, does the scholarship replace loans or grants?


10. How do I apply for financial aid? Which application forms are required to apply for financial aid? Does the college require the CSS Financial Aid PROFILE or its own forms in addition the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)?


11. What are the deadlines for applying for financial aid?


12. How does the financial aid application process differ for early admission students?


13. When will I receive my financial aid award letter?


14. If the financial aid is insufficient or my circumstances have changed, how do I appeal for more financial aid?


15. Where can I find information about other sources of financial aid, such as state grant programs and scholarships?


Don't forget to ask about special circumstances that are specific to your situation, such as divorce/separation or financial aid for study abroad.


See also the ten questions in Fastweb's Quick Reference Guide to Evaluating Financial Aid Award Letters.


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How to Deal if Your Parents Won't Pay

How to Deal if Your Parents Won't Pay

Unfortunately, federal aid isn't distributed on whether or not your parents want to pay for your education; it all depends on if they can. Parents have many reasons for not contributing to their child's education: can't afford it; it's the child's responsibility; sticky divorce. But your parents refusal actually hurts you more than they may know.


Regardless of your parents' reasons, the federal government's opinion is this: paying for a college education is your parents' primary responsibility. The government will only finance your education if it's impossible for your parents to pay up. So what should you do? Fill out the FAFSA.


Even if you don't qualify for need-based aid, filling out the FAFSA automatically qualifies you for an unsubsidized Stafford Loan. Yes, "loan" may be an icky word, but a federal government loan is the best loan opportunity that you will ever come across. The interest rates are low, and the payment plans make it easy to pay off your student loan debt.


Also, by filling out the FAFSA, you may qualify for subsidized Stafford and Perkins Loans as well as Pell Grants, which are even better.


Pitch the idea from the angle that they don't have to help financially but they can do you this huge favor. Additionally, it's not a bad idea to go to your school's financial aid office and present them with your situation. Maybe they can pull some strings or talk Mom and Dad into helping. Still not budging? Check out these other tips on convincing your parents to help this one last time.


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Avoiding a Finals Week Freak-Out

Avoiding a Finals Week Freak-Out

There are still several weeks before finals fever sets in, but many students are already feeling the stress.


Even though in college most classes are just a semester long, spring finals week always seems a little more chaotic and high-stakes than winter finals week—the weather is nice, the sun is shining, and everyone is pumped up for a long summer.


That can make focusing on what you have to get done nearly impossible in the moment, when all you want to do is throw a frisbee around or sun yourself on the quad.


So, in order to make that stressful week a little more palatable, start thinking ahead!


Get the little things out of the way now



If your professors are anything like some of mine, you have upwards of a dozen little assignments that are due in April and even during finals week in May.

If you know what they’ll entail, get started on them (or even finish them!) now or during your midterm break.


Start making your study materials ASAP



While flashcards and outlines are definitely helpful, they aren’t so great when you end up making 300 of them the weekend before a test. You will have spent hours making them when you could have used that time to study!

Start making your flashcards and outlines now; that way you can use them to study for quizzes and tests that will come before the final.


If you want to go a greener route, find a web site where you can make virtual flashcards—they get the job done but you’ll save some paper and money!


If you study best in a group, make a group Google Doc and have everyone outline the topics that they know the best.

This is especially helpful if you’ve missed some class periods or if you struggled with some of the material—sometimes all it takes is a fresh explanation to make information click!


Set a timer



I’m sure you’ve heard this one before—in fact, I’m sure you’ve heard it enough that you’re sick of it. It rings true, however, and it’s one that I use all the time for all different kinds of assignments.

This may be particularly helpful if you’re a chronic procrastinator. If you set a timer for ten, fifteen, or thirty minutes every day, you’ll end up spending a good chunk of your week studying and the information will stick better.


Use a variety of study materials



Simply rereading your notes ad infinitum won’t do much for you in the long run; eventually your brain will turn off during your study sessions and you won’t end up absorbing any more information than you already had.

Videos can be a great resource for learning and retaining information. Check out organizations like Khan Academy for videos about all sorts of different topics, from math to science to vocabulary!


There are also student-made videos on YouTube that give mnemonic devices (one of my favorites is the order of the 12 cranial nerves and their functions set to the tune of Lady Gaga’s “Poker Face”).


Consider downloading a voice recording app and reading your notes out loud so you can listen to them when you’re doing other things, like cooking or driving. You could also make audio flashcards by asking questions on the recording and then, while you’re listening, answering them out loud.


Think about how you best learn and tailor your study strategies to that style: if you’re a doer, try rewriting your notes from memory or drawing out important diagrams and pictures.


You’ll retain more information than you would from simple reading and rereading.


Plan a reward



Even though it might seem that the end of the school year is a reward in and of itself, it’s important to think of things to look forward to other than “no more pencils, no more books!”

It could be anything from making yourself a delicious dinner to your annual family vacation to simply having more time to read.


Make a list of what you’re excited to do once finals are over and refer back to it whenever you’re down about studying!






What are your best tried-and-true finals study tips?


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Does Financial Aid Cover Room and Board in Addition to Tuition and Fees?

I am currently a senior at a high school. If I want to dorm at a

private university, which adds $10,000 more to the $40,000 tuition, do

the universities take into account the financial aid as a whole thing

with tuition and room and board, or do they just give financial aid

for the tuition? To simplify this, my total costs of one year in

college would be $50,000, so would they give me financial aid for that

money, or would they give me aid just for the tuition?

— S.S.


Financial aid is based on the full cost of college, including room and

board, not just tuition and fees. But the amount of financial aid is

reduced by a measure of your ability to pay, so you are unlikely to

get a completely free ride at any college, even if you are very

poor. Also, financial aid packages usually include loans, which have

to be repaid (with interest).


The amount of financial aid depends on financial need, which is

defined as the difference between the cost of attendance and the

expected family contribution (EFC). The EFC is a measure of ability to

pay based on the family income and assets. It is determined after the

student submits the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

and other financial aid application forms. The cost of attendance

— sometimes called the student budget — includes tuition

and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation and

personal expenses. The cost of attendance may be adjusted on a

case-by-case basis at the discretion of the college's financial aid

administrator to include dependent care costs, disability-related

expenses and/or the cost of a computer.


Most colleges have three student budget figures, depending on whether

the student lives on campus in a dormitory, at home with his or her

parents or off campus in an apartment. If you live on campus in a

dormitory, the room and board figure will be based on the actual

charges for the dorm room and the required meal plans. If you live off

campus in an apartment or with your parents, the student budget will

include an allowance determined by the college.


Most colleges base the off-campus room and

board figures on a local rent survey, the College Board's

Living Expense Budget

or inflationary adjustments to the previous year's allowance. If your

costs are higher, most colleges will not adjust the cost of attendance

figures to compensate because student financial aid is not intended to

subsidize lifestyle choices. The main exception is when the higher

costs are due to accommodations for a disability.


Not every college awards enough financial aid to cover the full

demonstrated need of the students. Some colleges practice gapping,

where the student is left with some unmet need. This may

increase the amount that must be borrowed to pay for college. Typically,

Bachelor's degree recipients who have unmet need in

their senior year graduate with more debt than those

without any unmet need.


Even when the college meets a student's full demonstrated financial need,

the financial aid package will usually include some student loans. (The

main exception is the

six dozen elite colleges that have adopted no loans financial aid policies.

Students at these "no loans" colleges still borrow to pay for the

family's contribution to college costs, but do graduate with less

debt.) While the amount of gift aid increases with increasing college

costs, total grants typically represent only about 30 percent of the

cost of attendance, even at the more expensive colleges. Debt at

graduation correlates very strongly with the cost of attendance and

tuition, so you are more likely to graduate with excessive debt at a

college with a sticker price of $50,000 or more than at a college that

charges half as much.


The colleges you are considering are among the most expensive colleges

in the US. You should consider some less expensive colleges, such as

an in-state public college or a college located in a less expensive

area of the country. It is also a good idea to apply to a "financial

aid safety school", which is a college that will not only accept you,

but where you could afford to enroll even if you got no financial aid.


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Choosing a Major That's Perfect for You

Choosing a Major That's Perfect for You

"What's your major?" No question causes college students so much angst. But this doesn't have to be the case. Take the right steps to select the major that fits your goals.


Take Your Time—But Start Now


"The first piece of advice I'd give any undecided student is to relax, " says Mary Schilling, director of Career Services at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Be ready to explore and experiment. "The average student changes his or her major two to three times during the college career," Schilling says. Even if the first major you pick isn't the one you stick with, you'll improve your chances of finding the right fit if you shop around.


What Does Your Major Mean?


Majors mean different things to different students, so start by figuring out what your major means to you. For some, the college major is training for a career. For others, choosing a major is a path to personal fulfillment that has no connection to future career plans. Keep these in mind:





  • A career-related major means an easier job hunt after college, but you may miss out on the breadth of learning college can offer. Plan to take electives outside of your major to balance your intellectual development.



  • If you choose a non-career-related major, you'll have to work harder outside the classroom to develop your career goals. Plan to start career research early and do internships every summer to get the job experience and connections you need.


And while some careers obviously require a specific college major (e.g. future nurses need to major in nursing), other career paths are more flexible, especially if professional school is required. "Students interested in becoming lawyers do not have to have a degree in political science and pre-med students do not need to major in biology," Schilling says.


Plan Ahead to Meet Deadlines


When do you have to choose? Many colleges give a deadline by which you have to declare your major—often by your junior year.


But there may be additional hidden deadlines. Many popular majors require the completion of prerequisites—courses you must complete before you can declare the major. Schools use these prerequisites to help control enrollment in crowded majors. If you put off taking these classes, you may not be able to complete the prerequisites in time to declare your major.


To avoid these complications, start your decision-making process the first day of freshman year:





  • Identify the majors that may interest you and learn about the requirements for declaring and completing these majors. Consult your school's course catalog and ask to speak to an academic counselor in your top-choice majors.



  • When choosing electives, take courses that serve as first-level prerequisites for your prospective majors. By the time you finish your electives, you may find you've completed your major prerequisites as well.



  • Pay attention to the courses you like—and the ones you don't. "If studying a certain subject is like pulling teeth or is the last thing you want to do, then something's wrong," advises Brown University student Seth Pipkin.



  • Be willing to revisit and revise your choices. Did you choose a major, only to find out it's not what you expected? If you started your exploration early in your college career, you'll still have time to explore other choices.


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From Intern to Infamy

From Intern to Infamy

Though these names may be recognizable in most households now, there was a time in which they were just students, looking for their start.


They had to start from the bottom to become the infamous celebrities they are today, paying their dues through hard work, dedication and, yes, interning.


Then again, there is the occasional already-celebrity intern, like Kanye West or Ashley Olsen, who were already famous and took on internships.


Either way, you may be surprised to discover which top celebrities have held internships throughout their careers.


Oprah Winfrey









It’s difficult to remember a time before Oprah. Or, better stated, a time before Oprah Winfrey was Oprah. But, there was such a time (it's hard to think about) and that time was pre-internship.


Oprah’s internship with CBS affiliate WLAC-TV in Nashville was obviously just the beginning. Internships.com reports that from there, she was hired full-time as an anchor/reporter, making her the first African-American female news anchor.


From there, she soared to success in news programs, eventually landing her own national television spot, The Oprah Winfrey Show in 1986. (That’s her career summed up in the smallest of nutshells.)


Her story proves that internships (compiled with talent, of course) do lead to great things and, in Oprah’s case, achievements galore, billions and worldwide success.


Bill Gates









That’s right. He may have always been a genius but, before this genius became the Microsoft mogul, he held an internship position as a congressional page for the U.S. House of Representatives in 1972.


According to Internships.com, “congressional page” is a fancy title for a Capitol Hill intern. Two years later, Gates made history when he co-founded Microsoft.


Kanye West









When you’re a famous rapper wanting to break into the fashion industry or simply bored while taking a six-month music sabbatical because you dissed Taylor Swift at an internationally televised awards show - what do you do? Intern, of course.


It turns out that during his down town, Yeezy interned for Fendi.


Anderson Cooper









Before hosting shows on CNN, Anderson Cooper held a number of short-term jobs and internships, including one with the CIA.


According to Cooper, in an open letter written on CNN.com in 2006, “I know the CIA may sound more exotic and mysterious, but it was actually pretty bureaucratic and mundane, at least the little bit that I saw of it. By the end of the second summer, I realized it was not a place I wanted to work after college.


We’re glad he didn’t stay because it would have been a shame to waste those baby blues on the CIA.


Tom Hanks









He’s one of the great actors of our time and it’s hard to picture him as an average intern. But, Internships.com reports that, it’s actually an internship that inspired him to pursue a career in entertainment. While studying theater, Hanks met Vincent Dowling, head of the Great Lakes Theater Festival in Cleveland, Ohio, who offered him an internship.


Hanks loved the internship so much that he eventually dropped out of school and turned his internship into a three-year crash course experience, learning different areas of theater production.


He then went on to become Tom Hanks, the actor we know and love.


Betsey Johnson









Before she was a famous funky fashion designer, Betsey Johnson was a college student at the Pratt Institute. Her fashion career began with a post-college graduation internship at Mademoiselle magazine, which she landed after entering and winning the Mademoiselle Guest Editor Contest, according to Wikipedia.


Within the next year, she was part of the youthquake fashion movement and Andy Warhol’s underground scene, with non-other than Edie Sedgwick as the house model for her first boutique in 1969.

From there, her fashion career continued to rise and, in 2012, she celebrated 40 years in the fashion industry.


Steven Spielberg









Even as a teen, legendary director and producer, Steven Spielberg, was in pursuit of his entertainment dreams. The multiple Oscar winner got his foot in the door with a rather unusual “internship” arrangement, according to Internships.com.


As the story goes, a family friend who was an executive at Universal offered to give Spielberg some work around the set – the only caveat was that since the internship wasn’t official, Spielberg could not be granted access to the studio lot. Unwilling to give up such a great opportunity, the young Spielberg snuck onto the Universal Studios set to bypass the issue.


Post-internship, Spielberg continued to sneak into the Universal Studios’ lot and network. Apparently, it worked because now he is Steven Spielberg, renowned filmmaker.


Lauren Conrad









You may have witnessed her internship as it went down on MTV during “The Hills,” along with her entire high school experience on the “Laguna Beach” series.


MTV reality star, Lauren Conrad, interned with Teen Vogue while appearing on the “Laguna Beach” spin-off show, “The Hills,” and studying at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising.


John Krasinski









Well known for his role as Jim Halpert on NBC’s The Office, John Krasinski has also been in plenty of films, as well as taken on production, directorial and writing roles. But, according to Internships.com, it took a lot of hard work to get there.


After completing school, Krasinski relocated to New York City in pursuit of the silver screen. In 2000, he finally landed a script internship on Late Night with Conan O’Brien.


Seizing the invaluable opportunity, he used the connections he made on the show (and with NBC) as a springboard to launch his own career.


Ryan Seacrest









It wasn’t such a long time ago that television personality, host and producer, Ryan Seacrest wasn’t a household name. But, he’s been working long enough for it.


In fact, Wikipedia reports, he landed his internship at WSTR (FM) in Atlanta when he was only 16-years-old. The internship opportunity launched his broadcast career, as it’s where Seacrest received much of his on-air training in radio.


From there, he went on to study journalism at the University of Georgia and continued on local radio stations until he left college at age 19 to pursue his broadcasting career in Hollywood.


In 2002, Seacrest received his “big break” when he was thrust into the national spotlight as the co-host (now, sole host) of Fox’s then-new reality television series American Idol.


Ashley Olsen









If you grew up as a 90s kid, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen should sound as familiar as peanut butter and jelly. While studying at NYU, former Full House star interned for fashion designer Zac Posen.


The experience likely comes in handy while running the fashion labels, The Row, and, Elizabeth and James, with sister, Mary-Kate.


Aziz Ansari









Aziz Ansari is a name we hold synonymous with laughter but at one point, the actor and comedian was too shy to admit he was a comedian.


So, when he held an internship with the Onion it wasn’t in the writing department, as one would expect but, rather, Ansari held an advertising internship.


Ansari discussed his internship during an interview with AVClub.com, “I interned there when I was a sophomore at NYU, and I just interned at the advertising department. I just hung around and played foosball, pretty much. Everyone was really nice, and I still keep in touch with a few people. It was a fun internship, but it wasn’t like I was in the writer’s room or anything like that. I was just going around and delivering checks and stuff.”


We bet they regret letting him slip past their radar!


Tom Ford









Creative to the core, Tom Ford studied architecture at Parsons before making the switch to fashion after working a – get this - press internship at fashion label, Chloé, according to his Wikipedia page.


Though he refocused his studies on fashion, he ultimately graduated with a degree in architecture.


What’s a piece of paper when you’ve got talent like that?


Ford quickly went on climb the ranks of the fashion industry and become creative director for Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent (YSL), winning coveted fashion awards and bring the almost-bankrupt fashion houses back to unparalleled success. In 2004, Ford parted with the Gucci group and launched his own Tom Ford label.


He has also dabbled in film, launching his own film production company and made his directorial debut with the film, A Single Man in 2009, to rave reviews and award nods galore.


In an interview with Grazia, a UK magazine, Tom Ford discussed internships and hard work saying, “I think this is the problem today, people come out of school and think they should immediately be a star.”


He continued, “But I think everyone should be an intern - you should sweep floors, you should pick up pins. You should run errands because you learn so much.”


Well said, Mr. Ford. We could not agree more.


Sylvia Plath







Late-author Sylvia Plath held an internship at Mademoiselle magazine in 1953. Plath spent a summer living in New York City while working in the magazine’s Manhattan offices.


Though fictionalized, her famous novel, The Bell Jar was inspired by her experiences during her magazine internship.


Alec Baldwin









The “30 Rock” star has often been rumored to have thought about a run for political office and now we know why: he has roots on the hill.


Baldwin took on a congressional internship with the late congressman Rep. Jerome Ambro in the ‘70s as a college student at George Washington University.


Seth Meyers









The Late Night with Seth Meyers host and former Saturday Night Live Star got his start with none other than a Comedy Central internship – but Meyers didn’t get such a great employee review.


According to, US Weekly, Meyers discussed the experience saying, I had an internship once at Comedy Central in college and they said I worked really hard for five weeks and then I spent the rest of it watching Kids in the Hall," he explained. "They weren't wrong."


We’re glad he got his act together.


Sean Combs









While majoring in business administration at Howard University, Combs reportedly met fellow rapper Heavy D, who made some introductions on Combs’ behalf.


Apparently, the networking paid off and secured Combs his internship at New York's Uptown Records, which he dropped out of college to pursue.


This led to a talent director position and Combs quickly climbed the ladder finally leaving the company in the early 1990s as a vice president. He went on to start his own production company and solo career.


Conan O’Brien









The late night host and funnyman worked as a congressional intern for both Rep. Robert Drinan and Rep. Barney Frank in the House of Representatives.


O’Brien discussed his internship experience and short-lived career in politics during an ”Inside the Actor’s Studio” episode explaining that he didn’t pursue politics because, “I didn’t want to work my way up.”


Lena Dunham









Lena Dunham interned at independent publisher, Soft Skull, according to the Los Angeles Times.


According to their interview with Richard Nash, the independent publisher Dunham interned for, “she[Dunham] was great as expected.”


"You always want to feel like your interns are going to go on and do great things," Nash said. "I don't think Soft Skull can take the slightest credit for Lena's success, but it's always fun when interns become writers and publishers and things like that."


Steve Jobs









While in high school, Steve Jobs was offered an internship with Hewlett-Packard after brazenly calling president and co-founder William Hewlett to “ask for parts for a high school project.”


Impressed by the student’s gumption, Hewlett not only offered Jobs the parts for the project, but also a Hewlett-Packard internship.


According to Entrepreneur.com, it was at that summer internship where Jobs met and became friends with an engineer by the name of Steve Wozniak.


The two ended up founding a company called Apple Inc., maybe you’ve heard of it?






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Infamous Interns

Though these names may be recognizable in most households now, there was a time in which they were just students, looking for their start.


They had to start from the bottom to become the infamous celebrities they are today, paying their dues through hard work, dedication and, yes, interning.


Then again, there is the occasional already-celebrity intern, like Kanye West or Ashley Olsen, who were already famous and took on internships.


Either way, you may be surprised to discover which top celebrities have held internships throughout their careers.


Oprah Winfrey









It’s difficult to remember a time before Oprah. Or, better stated, a time before Oprah Winfrey was Oprah. But, there was such a time (it's hard to think about) and that time was pre-internship.


Oprah’s internship with CBS affiliate WLAC-TV in Nashville was obviously just the beginning. Internships.com reports that from there, she was hired full-time as an anchor/reporter, making her the first African-American female news anchor.


From there, she soared to success in news programs, eventually landing her own national television spot, The Oprah Winfrey Show in 1986. (That’s her career summed up in the smallest of nutshells.)


Her story proves that internships (compiled with talent, of course) do lead to great things and, in Oprah’s case, achievements galore, billions and worldwide success.


Bill Gates









That’s right. He may have always been a genius but, before this genius became the Microsoft mogul, he held an internship position as a congressional page for the U.S. House of Representatives in 1972.


According to Internships.com, “congressional page” is a fancy title for a Capitol Hill intern. Two years later, Gates made history when he co-founded Microsoft.


Kanye West









When you’re a famous rapper wanting to break into the fashion industry or simply bored while taking a six-month music sabbatical because you dissed Taylor Swift at an internationally televised awards show - what do you do? Intern, of course.


It turns out that during his down town, Yeezy interned for Fendi.


Anderson Cooper









Before hosting shows on CNN, Anderson Cooper held a number of short-term jobs and internships, including one with the CIA.


According to Cooper, in an open letter written on CNN.com in 2006, “I know the CIA may sound more exotic and mysterious, but it was actually pretty bureaucratic and mundane, at least the little bit that I saw of it. By the end of the second summer, I realized it was not a place I wanted to work after college.


We’re glad he didn’t stay because it would have been a shame to waste those baby blues on the CIA.


Tom Hanks









He’s one of the great actors of our time and it’s hard to picture him as an average intern. But, Internships.com reports that, it’s actually an internship that inspired him to pursue a career in entertainment. While studying theater, Hanks met Vincent Dowling, head of the Great Lakes Theater Festival in Cleveland, Ohio, who offered him an internship.


Hanks loved the internship so much that he eventually dropped out of school and turned his internship into a three-year crash course experience, learning different areas of theater production.


He then went on to become Tom Hanks, the actor we know and love.


Betsey Johnson









Before she was a famous funky fashion designer, Betsey Johnson was a college student at the Pratt Institute. Her fashion career began with a post-college graduation internship at Mademoiselle magazine, which she landed after entering and winning the Mademoiselle Guest Editor Contest, according to Wikipedia.


Within the next year, she was part of the youthquake fashion movement and Andy Warhol’s underground scene, with non-other than Edie Sedgwick as the house model for her first boutique in 1969.

From there, her fashion career continued to rise and, in 2012, she celebrated 40 years in the fashion industry.


Steven Spielberg









Even as a teen, legendary director and producer, Steven Spielberg, was in pursuit of his entertainment dreams. The multiple Oscar winner got his foot in the door with a rather unusual “internship” arrangement, according to Internships.com.


As the story goes, a family friend who was an executive at Universal offered to give Spielberg some work around the set – the only caveat was that since the internship wasn’t official, Spielberg could not be granted access to the studio lot. Unwilling to give up such a great opportunity, the young Spielberg snuck onto the Universal Studios set to bypass the issue.


Post-internship, Spielberg continued to sneak into the Universal Studios’ lot and network. Apparently, it worked because now he is Steven Spielberg, renowned filmmaker.


Lauren Conrad









You may have witnessed her internship as it went down on MTV during “The Hills,” along with her entire high school experience on the “Laguna Beach” series.


MTV reality star, Lauren Conrad, interned with Teen Vogue while appearing on the “Laguna Beach” spin-off show, “The Hills,” and studying at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising.


John Krasinski









Well known for his role as Jim Halpert on NBC’s The Office, John Krasinski has also been in plenty of films, as well as taken on production, directorial and writing roles. But, according to Internships.com, it took a lot of hard work to get there.


After completing school, Krasinski relocated to New York City in pursuit of the silver screen. In 2000, he finally landed a script internship on Late Night with Conan O’Brien.


Seizing the invaluable opportunity, he used the connections he made on the show (and with NBC) as a springboard to launch his own career.


Ryan Seacrest









It wasn’t such a long time ago that television personality, host and producer, Ryan Seacrest wasn’t a household name. But, he’s been working long enough for it.


In fact, Wikipedia reports, he landed his internship at WSTR (FM) in Atlanta when he was only 16-years-old. The internship opportunity launched his broadcast career, as it’s where Seacrest received much of his on-air training in radio.


From there, he went on to study journalism at the University of Georgia and continued on local radio stations until he left college at age 19 to pursue his broadcasting career in Hollywood.


In 2002, Seacrest received his “big break” when he was thrust into the national spotlight as the co-host (now, sole host) of Fox’s then-new reality television series American Idol.


Ashley Olsen









If you grew up as a 90s kid, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen should sound as familiar as peanut butter and jelly. While studying at NYU, former Full House star interned for fashion designer Zac Posen.


The experience likely comes in handy while running the fashion labels, The Row, and, Elizabeth and James, with sister, Mary-Kate.


Aziz Ansari









Aziz Ansari is a name we hold synonymous with laughter but at one point, the actor and comedian was too shy to admit he was a comedian.


So, when he held an internship with the Onion it wasn’t in the writing department, as one would expect but, rather, Ansari held an advertising internship.


Ansari discussed his internship during an interview with AVClub.com, “I interned there when I was a sophomore at NYU, and I just interned at the advertising department. I just hung around and played foosball, pretty much. Everyone was really nice, and I still keep in touch with a few people. It was a fun internship, but it wasn’t like I was in the writer’s room or anything like that. I was just going around and delivering checks and stuff.”


We bet they regret letting him slip past their radar!


Tom Ford









Creative to the core, Tom Ford studied architecture at Parsons before making the switch to fashion after working a – get this - press internship at fashion label, Chloé, according to his Wikipedia page.


Though he refocused his studies on fashion, he ultimately graduated with a degree in architecture.


What’s a piece of paper when you’ve got talent like that?


Ford quickly went on climb the ranks of the fashion industry and become creative director for Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent (YSL), winning coveted fashion awards and bring the almost-bankrupt fashion houses back to unparalleled success. In 2004, Ford parted with the Gucci group and launched his own Tom Ford label.


He has also dabbled in film, launching his own film production company and made his directorial debut with the film, A Single Man in 2009, to rave reviews and award nods galore.


In an interview with Grazia, a UK magazine, Tom Ford discussed internships and hard work saying, “I think this is the problem today, people come out of school and think they should immediately be a star.”


He continued, “But I think everyone should be an intern - you should sweep floors, you should pick up pins. You should run errands because you learn so much.”


Well said, Mr. Ford. We could not agree more.


Sylvia Plath







Late-author Sylvia Plath held an internship at Mademoiselle magazine in 1953. Plath spent a summer living in New York City while working in the magazine’s Manhattan offices.


Though fictionalized, her famous novel, The Bell Jar was inspired by her experiences during her magazine internship.


Alec Baldwin









The “30 Rock” star has often been rumored to have thought about a run for political office and now we know why: he has roots on the hill.


Baldwin took on a congressional internship with the late congressman Rep. Jerome Ambro in the ‘70s as a college student at George Washington University.


Seth Meyers









The Late Night with Seth Meyers host and former Saturday Night Live Star got his start with none other than a Comedy Central internship – but Meyers didn’t get such a great employee review.


According to, US Weekly, Meyers discussed the experience saying, I had an internship once at Comedy Central in college and they said I worked really hard for five weeks and then I spent the rest of it watching Kids in the Hall," he explained. "They weren't wrong."


We’re glad he got his act together.


Sean Combs









While majoring in business administration at Howard University, Combs reportedly met fellow rapper Heavy D, who made some introductions on Combs’ behalf.


Apparently, the networking paid off and secured Combs his internship at New York's Uptown Records, which he dropped out of college to pursue.


This led to a talent director position and Combs quickly climbed the ladder finally leaving the company in the early 1990s as a vice president. He went on to start his own production company and solo career.


Conan O’Brien









The late night host and funnyman worked as a congressional intern for both Rep. Robert Drinan and Rep. Barney Frank in the House of Representatives.


O’Brien discussed his internship experience and short-lived career in politics during an ”Inside the Actor’s Studio” episode explaining that he didn’t pursue politics because, “I didn’t want to work my way up.”


Lena Dunham









Lena Dunham interned at independent publisher, Soft Skull, according to the Los Angeles Times.


According to their interview with Richard Nash, the independent publisher Dunham interned for, “she[Dunham] was great as expected.”


"You always want to feel like your interns are going to go on and do great things," Nash said. "I don't think Soft Skull can take the slightest credit for Lena's success, but it's always fun when interns become writers and publishers and things like that."


Steve Jobs









While in high school, Steve Jobs was offered an internship with Hewlett-Packard after brazenly calling president and co-founder William Hewlett to “ask for parts for a high school project.”


Impressed by the student’s gumption, Hewlett not only offered Jobs the parts for the project, but also a Hewlett-Packard internship.


According to Entrepreneur.com, it was at that summer internship where Jobs met and became friends with an engineer by the name of Steve Wozniak.


The two ended up founding a company called Apple Inc., maybe you’ve heard of it?






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